Because of the circumstances in which they encounter it, children tend to misunderstand wealth. They confuse it with money. They think that there is a fixed amount of it. And they think of it as something that’s distributed by authorities (and so should be distributed equally), rather than something that has to be created (and might be created unequally).

In fact, wealth is not money. Money is just a convenient way of trading one form of wealth for another. Wealth is the underlying stuff—the goods and services we buy. When you travel to a rich or poor country, you don’t have to look at people’s bank accounts to tell which kind you’re in. You can see wealth—in buildings and streets, in the clothes and the health of the people.

Where does wealth come from? People make it. This was easier to grasp when most people lived on farms, and made many of the things they wanted with their own hands. Then you could see in the house, the herds, and the granary the wealth that each family created. It was obvious then too that the wealth of the world was not a fixed quantity that had to be shared out, like slices of a pie. If you wanted more wealth, you could make it.

Paul Graham, Mind the Gap (via anarchei)

(Source: self-ownership)

129 notes

officialfrenchtoast:

Bronn is one of the best characters tbh

5,093 notes

You spend your whole life stuck in the labyrinth, thinking about how you’ll escape one day, and how awesome it will be, and imagining that future keeps you going, but you never do it. You just use the future to escape the present.
― John Green (via psych-quotes)

1,698 notes

Magic exists. Who can doubt it, when there are rainbows and wildflowers, the music of the wind and the silence of the stars? Anyone who has loved has been touched by magic. It is such a simple and such an extraordinary part of the lives we live.
― Nora Roberts (via psych-quotes)

1,532 notes

It is dreadful when something weighs on your mind, not to have a soul to unburden yourself to. You know what I mean. I tell my piano the things I used to tell you.

Frédéric Chopin

(via view-from-nowhere)

(Source: sad-plath)

2,286 notes

paleoillustration:

Sea World. By Alexis Rockman.
"Rockman likes to play with our expectations of what’s normal. In the painting called Sea World, an audience watches as a collection of marine animals performs tricks, but the animals are nothing like the killer whales and dolphins we’re used to seeing.
"They’re familiar because of their roles," says Rockman. "Some of them are familiar from paleontological history. You have a Dunkleosteus, which to me is the most frightening predator in history. It’s a Devonian fish that’s now, luckily for humans, extinct, but it was enormous and very frightening.”
The sea creatures, somehow restored to life in a theme park, hint at a future where cloning makes re-creating extinct animals possible.
"That’s part of his signature style — to make the familiar seem foreign to make our world seem otherworldly," says Joanna Marsh, curator of the exhibition. And genetic engineering, she says, "is a recurring subject in Rockman’s work." npr

paleoillustration:

Sea World. By Alexis Rockman.

"Rockman likes to play with our expectations of what’s normal. In the painting called Sea World, an audience watches as a collection of marine animals performs tricks, but the animals are nothing like the killer whales and dolphins we’re used to seeing.

"They’re familiar because of their roles," says Rockman. "Some of them are familiar from paleontological history. You have a Dunkleosteus, which to me is the most frightening predator in history. It’s a Devonian fish that’s now, luckily for humans, extinct, but it was enormous and very frightening.”

The sea creatures, somehow restored to life in a theme park, hint at a future where cloning makes re-creating extinct animals possible.

"That’s part of his signature style — to make the familiar seem foreign to make our world seem otherworldly," says Joanna Marsh, curator of the exhibition. And genetic engineering, she says, "is a recurring subject in Rockman’s work." npr

821 notes

No entiendo. Me habías dicho: “No nos vamos a ver más. Somos libres”. Yo me quedé muda mirándote la espalda y te perdiste en la esquina de la estación. ¿Qué esperabas? ¿Que te corriera atrás? ¿Que te llamara a gritos? ¿Para qué quería yo esa libertad que me regalabas? ¿Para qué la quería?
Eduardo Galeano (via poesiaespanol)

325 notes